It’s a candle festival up in here

Layered Candle Upcycle

Layered Candle Upcycle

My Half-Burned Candles

My Half-Burned Candles

Yesterday we started spring cleaning. Along the way, I noticed I finally had enough half-burned candles to combine into new layered candles. I pinned this awesome idea on Pinterest about a year ago, and I am so excited about the results. See picture below for link to Happy-Go-Lucky’s original post about this, which I followed.

Happy-Go-Lucky: Easy Candle Upcycle

Happy-Go-Lucky: Easy Candle Upcycle

Boiling the candles

Boiling the candles

Mason Jars

Mason Jars

Supplies: Candle Wicks, Pencil or Pen, Clean Jar or vase

Supplies: Candle Wicks, Pencil or Pen, Clean Jar or vase

You have to wait for one layer to dry before adding the next layer.

You have to wait for one layer to dry before adding the next layer.

I had several candles going at once!

I had several candles going at once! The pencil kept the wick in the middle as I poured.

My mom gave me a couple candles that were not in glass- so I re-used a vase I had already emptied to heat up the candle.

My mom gave me a couple candles that were not in glass- so I re-used a vase I had already emptied to heat up the candle.

Labels

Layered Candles Complete!

It smells awesome in my house today now that I am finished- it smells like a candle factory!

It took a little longer than I expected, because you have to wait for each layer to dry. I tried to keep the scents within the same family. Florals, Clean Smells, Holiday…Also, I have made a mental note to buy more colorful candles- mine were mostly shades of white and tan! Cute labels would have been nice if you were going to give these as a gift. Ta Da!!!

Love Allie

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Lila’s Changing Table

20121117-175603.jpgI have received many compliments on the dresser that I painted in Lila’s Nursery. While I would love to take most of the credit, really it was quite easy (for an 8 months prego girl) with Annie Sloan’s chalk paint. I picked up the paint at The White Goat here in Little Rock. They helped me pick out my paint, and showed me how to use the paints. (They had classes available, I still want to go sometime…)

The coolest thing about the paint is you don’t have to prime your surface before you start. So for someone who like to dive head-first into a project, that definitely speeds up the process.

I used a mixture of Provence and Old World White. I only bought the small tub of Provence as a sample, but it lasted the whole project because I watered it down and mixed white with it! Sweet! I did invest in a quart of the Old White, and have tons leftover.

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I believe the end result was a ratio of 1:6. After the dresser and drawers were dry, I dry-brushed some more white on top. (Dry-brushing is done best with a cheap brush and a little paint on a paper plate. ) LESS IS MORE! You can always add more paint, but it’s hard to take off a big glob if you get too much on your brush. Dry-brushing is a fun way to make the piece look aged. You can also distress your piece by sanding the edges. I used a sandpaper block on mine.

20121117-173812.jpgI used Annie Sloan’s Soft Wax in clear to seal the dresser. (It’s slightly stinky, so I wore a mask.) I applied it with a cloth and wore gloves. Wax on, wax off, Mr. Miagi!! I would suggest doing the top all at the same time, not in sections. This is why: My hubby helped me with the wax, and we split the top. He did not rub the wax off as much as I did, and it was noticeable!! So I re-waxed the whole thing. (Hubby rolls eyes at my obsessive tendencies, but it had to be perrrrfect).
You really have to buff out the wax. I kept using clean scrap cloths as I went.

Lastly, I spray painted the original handles glossy white to finish out the look. Yay, project complete! Love this paint and wax. It really looks and feels like an expensive piece of furniture.